Full Text

Cǒte d'Ivoire, post-independence protest

Naminata Diabate


Subject History » Political History
Social Movements » Collective Behaviour

Place Africa » Western Africa

Period 2000 - present
1000 - 1999 » 1900-1999

Key-Topics equality, rebellion, revolution, violence

DOI: 10.1111/b.9781405184649.2009.00414.x


Extract

Cǒte d'Ivoire gained political independence from France, the former colonial power, in 1960. For more than three decades to 1993, the Ivorian nation was ruled by President Félix Houphouët-Boigny, who termed the era “la démocratie à l'ivoirienne” (democracy Ivorian style). Cǒte d'Ivoire enjoyed political stability and relative socioeconomic prosperity. However, with Houphouët-Boigny's death in 1993, Cǒte d'Ivoire faced political instability typified by ethnicization of politics, social protests, military coups, and civil conflict with secessionist undertones. The instability was accentuated if not caused by poor economic conditions precipitated by the drop in cocoa and coffee prices on international markets and the imposition of austerity measures by multilateral agencies. Under Houphouët-Boigny's rule, Cǒte d'Ivoire experienced its first post-independence violent protests in a series of demonstrations by students, civil servants, and other segments of organized society from February to April 1990. The demonstrators protested a myriad of policies perpetuated by the government: rising inflation, retrenchment, and the deterioration in the quality of life. The unrest was also caused by privatization of national companies, viewed as instigated by western governments through the International Monetary Fund (IMF). During a protest on April 19, 1990, angry students demonstrated against ... log in or subscribe to read full text

Log In

You are not currently logged-in to Blackwell Reference Online

If your institution has a subscription, you can log in here:

 

     Forgotten your password?

Find out how to subscribe.

Your library does not have access to this title. Please contact your librarian to arrange access.


[ access key 0 : accessibility information including access key list ] [ access key 1 : home page ] [ access key 2 : skip navigation ] [ access key 6 : help ] [ access key 9 : contact us ] [ access key 0 : accessibility statement ]

Blackwell Publishing Home Page

Blackwell Reference Online ® is a Blackwell Publishing Inc. registered trademark
Technology partner: Semantico Ltd.

Blackwell Publishing and its licensors hold the copyright in all material held in Blackwell Reference Online. No material may be resold or published elsewhere without Blackwell Publishing's written consent, save as authorised by a licence with Blackwell Publishing or to the extent required by the applicable law.

Back to Top